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  • Tag Archives God
  • God’s Goodness

    God’s perceived goodness is like an odometer.  People who have great lives generally believe God is good.  People with middling lives don’t as much.  But when things get bad enough people start viewing God as good again.  This is why more people would say God was good in sub Saharan Africa where there is dire poverty than in Europe where there is relative security.  Of course when you are in extrmis you don’t have the luxury of hating God.  You are so far down you need all the allies you can get even if it comes at the expense of authentic self expression.



  • a good thing?

    Why the fuck do people think Jesus being God is a good thing?  You want to call yourself God, knock your self the fuck out but you get all the baggage associated with that deity.  Why would anyone want that?  For me finding Jesus as God just means that Jesus wants me to do all the crazy shit God does (like drink piss, kill myself, and date women out of my league).  So for me Jesus had so much going for him before whomever wanted him to be God got everyone to believe he was.  So depending on what you experience of God, finding Jesus as God can be salvation or a damnation.  In my case the latter.



  • Jesus

    People (at least Christians) say Jesus being God is good.  All I say is when you claim to be God you own all the baggage associated with him.  Why would you want that.  So I’m supposed to believe Jesus told me all the crazy shit God did.  I know Christians go out of their way to present other parts of the trinity as softer and more loving than God but if you are claiming they’re God then they inherit all the baggage God is associated with.  You can’t have your cake and eat it too.



  • God, one or three

    If you want to know me you should read this article on a programmer that believes God is instructing him on how to build and operating system.

    The article rings true because I fit the profile pretty well.  Someone who is a programmer, is mentally ill, and has had a psychotic break where I have transcribed what I believed was direct communication from God to a web page.

    The experience of receiving a direct communication from God is entropic.  You have a few options:

    1. You can choose to believe it and keep believing successive communications from God (while staying psychotic) like this man in the article
    2. You can attempt to write off the communications and try to re establish communication with God while sane.  The problem with this is once the revelations you had from God while psychotic are found to be frauds you have to actually have a kind of apostasy where your that world of revelations is blown to bits.  There is also the problem that compared to the way people say God’s revelations come (a “still small voice”) your direct revelations from God while psychotic seem so much more real.  There is also the problem that mental illness messes with your intuition, your mind is so loud the “still small voice” no longer is even audible.
    3. You can believe all communications with God are just going on in people’s heads.  The more I see inside myself and the world the more I realize the whole concept of a god that communicates with people is a lie.  There may be a god but he doesn’t communicate directly with people the way religious people claim he does.  Communication with God is heavily mediated by the brain so naturally if one is mentally ill the communications with God are going to be destructive.  It’s a no no in religious circles to say things like, “your mind is what the brain does” but my and many other’s lived experience bares this out.

    Which brings me full circle, after a psychotic break you can only choose option 1 or option 3.  Technically you can try to choose option two like I did but as your brain gets worse at doing the leg work of simulating interaction with a personal god you will drift off into option one or three.



  • Trinity

    One of the things I have been doing in the last ten years of my life is trying to visualize the Trinity.  It has been a costly journey and I still do not have anything that nails it down, but I try.
    trinity

    There was also something here about the body and the blood (yellow like a Lego man and red) and fire (because of the color) and water (because of the semi transparency).  And maybe even the sun at sunset.

     



  • free will not

    The same Christians that chime “because free will must stay intact” when confronted with the problem of evil are the ones whose prayers are pleas to change people.  As technology improves and we have mastery over more and more things (like curing diseases for example) the onus becomes more and more on our just actions and less on God’s.  More of the earth is subordinate to human free will than at any time in the past.  If we say God can’t mess with free will this leaves us in a little problem.  God is painted into a corner and reliant on his followers to plead with those in power to do the right thing.

    I might as well complicate things by saying that a lot of decisions humans have made (like flagging tax returns, diagnosing cancer, curating news, and in the near future driving cars) are done by computer algorithms, not people.  So we are trusting more and more of our lives to the will of computers.  I don’t know any religious tradition that has anything to say about this, people just couldn’t imagine something like this happening.  So do we pray to God that a computer will make a just decision on our behalf when it’s still just a Turing machine?  Aren’t all computer algorithms deterministic so they are the ultimate expression of the lack of free will?

    In a way artificially intelligent computers are analogous to spirits because their inner workings and thought processes are a mystery and they do not possess flesh.  But they aren’t sentient, but there is always the possibility that a sufficiently intelligent computer might be operated by some kind of spirit.  I know this is nonsense to most materialist philosophers but I think it’s a subject worth exploring.